A Guide to Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)

  • Marie Claire enjoys the support of its audience. When you make purchases through links on our site, we may earn commissions on certain items you select.

  • As Davina details her HRT routine.

    Have you ever heard of hormone replacement therapy? If you weren’t there before this week, you might have given that there is currently a nationwide shortage in the UK.

    While about a million women in the UK take HRT, Davina McCall started a more public conversation about it last year with her show, Sex, Myths and Menopause, During this, he told in detail about his experience about the treatment.

    HRT has gotten a bad rap over the years—while the drug is most thoroughly evaluated through research and clinical trials, it is still sometimes given thanks to a 2002 study in which Was warned of breast cancer risk – Davina says HRT “has changed” [her] life “for the better.

    Now, she wants her experience to help others. Urging women to seek “correct information”, the presenter shared her view that the information inside HRT packets, which may turn many women away from treatment, is “wrong”.

    Davina shared, “Many women get the prescription and then they throw it in the bin because they read all the information and they get scared.” “So get the right information and then if I were you, I’d go over it right away if you think it’s right for you, because it has revolutionized my life.”

    Davina also feels that the stigma surrounding HRT is unnecessary. “It’s interesting how people make you feel like it’s something you’re doing to try and ‘stay young’ or it’s a cop-out, something vulnerable,” she said. “But all you’re doing is replacing the hormones that are gone.”

    The average age for menopause in the UK is 51 and is defined as the absence of menstruation for 12 months, but the period before that is called perimenopause and can last for several years. “We now understand that the transition to menopause is a gradual process and that women can have a rollercoaster ride of fluctuating hormones that can actually impair their quality of life,” shares Aziz Scott.

    Here, two doctors explain what hormone replacement therapy is, how it works, what the common side effects are, and how to find out if it’s the right option for you.

    Hormone Replacement Therapy: Your Guide

    What is HRT?

    HRT is a treatment — usually a tablet or skin patch — that works by replacing the hormones that decrease during the menopausal period, shares Aziz Scott. Doc Martin as Kinsella, founder of BioID HealthExplains, “As the name suggests, the drug replaces female sex hormones (estrogen and progesterone), which naturally decrease during menopause.”

    By doing this, you reduce the symptoms of menopause by replacing the hormones that naturally decrease with age.

    why is it important? Simply put, because each of our hormones has a specific function and further, the symptoms related to its deficiency. “For example, a lack of estrogen causes hot flushes, night sweats, and vaginal dryness,” shares Dr.

    “Progesterone deficiency associates with insomnia and anxiety while testosterone replacement will improve energy and libido. In addition, all of these hormones are neurosteroids and can have an effect on brain function, particularly memory – a common menopausal complaint. “

    Hormone replacement therapy: top view of various pills and pills on a pink background

    Are there different types of HRT?

    Yes, there are. “Essentially there are two types of HRT options; Combined HRT or estrogen-only,” Kinsella shares. “Combined HRT is a prescription that replaces both estrogen and progesterone, to regulate hormone levels. Estrogen-only HRT is usually only prescribed for women who have had a hysterectomy (their womb was removed).

    There are also many different ways to take HRT. Because there are so many, expect to take the time to find the right combination.

    Those periods:

    • pills
    • skin spots
    • gel
    • vaginal cream
    • pessary
    • rings.

    Fun facts: As time goes on, the science has evolved which means that we now also have Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy (BHRT). “Unlike standard HRT, which is derived from synthetic hormones, BHRT is made from plant sources that are similar to the hormones your body makes naturally,” Kinsella explains.

    HRT. side effects of

    Side effects related to estrogen replacement can be:

    Progesterone may be related to:

    • excess fluid in the body
    • mood.

    Similarly, testosterone can cause:

    However, with the right regimen to suit your needs, side effects only last a few weeks, shares Aziz Scott. “Symptoms can be reduced,” she assures.

    I don’t know if I should take HRT or not – HELP!

    Short answer – it’s up to you. Aziz Scott shares, “Most women see a huge improvement in quality of life with HRT with fewer symptoms, hot flushes and night sweats, improved sexual health and libido and better mood.” “Long-term health benefits such as reduced osteoporosis risk, improved cardiovascular health, and reduced risk of Alzheimer’s dementia are also well researched.”

    As Kinsella points out, there are pros and cons to this:

    Pros:

    • better quality of life
    • Alleviating symptoms like lack of sleep, fatigue, hot flushes and more
    • Osteoporosis prevention.

    Shortcoming:

    • Unpleasant side effects like bloating, leg cramps, headache, indigestion and more
    • There is an increased risk of blood clots and stroke.

    ground level: Doctors believe that the benefits of HRT usually outweigh the risks for most women. “The risks are usually small, depending on what type of HRT you take, how long you take it and your own health risks,” she continues.

    Hormone Replacement Therapy: Gels

    Can HRT cause breast cancer?

    Thanks to a 2002 study, women often have concerns about breast cancer risk. So what do doctors believe? “Recent research suggests that there is little or no change in breast cancer risk if you take estrogen and progesterone that are bioidentical or similar to the body,” she tells WebMD.

    “In fact, other risk factors such as obesity, lack of exercise, and smoking have a greater effect,” she warns. “But regular breast screening is important for breast cancer screening.”

    On that note – Kinsella shared that the taboo surrounding HRT has been around for years. “As we have established, no treatment or form of medication is completely risk-free,” he shares. “The key is to find a treatment that gets to the root of the problem and works for you and your body.”

    Davina’s HRT Routine: Estrogen Patches and More

    Sharing her morning HRT routine on Instagram, Davina elaborated on the gels, creams and patches she uses every day after shower. “My hormones are a big part of my morning routine and I thought I’d show you how to apply them to understand this a little bit,” she says.

    Talking about her Menopause documentary, she says: “I don’t think I’ve ever worked on a project that affected me so deeply. She added that she was regularly “broken by deep despair and anger.” Know how we are failing women. This film is not just for menopausal women, it is for their partners, their fathers, their brothers and their sons. we’re all in this together. I used to think menopause was an age thing and now I realize it is a woman thing. For too long, embarrassment, shame, and fear have been shrouded around this topic, and it stops here!”

    Her usual routine includes:

    1. an estrogen patch 2x a week

    The first thing you notice as you apply Davina is to remove a clear “hormone sticker” on her hip, called estradot, She changes the small plaster twice a week. “It leaves a little sticky stuff [like any plaster] But I thought you should see the ups and downs. I wanted you to see it warts and all.

    She turns hips when she changes stickers. “We use stickers because they’re transdermal [absorbed through the skin as opposed to a tablet] Transdermal is important because it is a better way to take HRT,” she shares.

    FYI — the patch is translucent “so whatever skin color you are it goes on clear,” or so she assures.

    2. Estrogen Gel – Daily

    Davina also uses a clear transdermal gel called Ostrogel. She rubs it into her upper arm and does so to increase her estrogen levels.

    Fun fact: “Nowadays estrogen is plant-based,” or so says Davina. “It’s made from yams. They’re very different from hormones taken back in the day.”

    3. Testosterone Cream – Daily

    Next, Davina rubs a testosterone cream into her thigh, but Davina shares that this particular hormone is less commonly prescribed and not widely available via prescription on the NHS.

    “I think you can have it if your libido is on the floor,” shares the presenter. “But it’s not just about sex drive. Did you know that testosterone is also a very important female hormone? My testosterone was low and I take pea-sized amounts.”

    “By the way, taking testosterone doesn’t make you or penis or testicles or hairy or anything like that. I’m not taking extra testosterone, I’m just replenishing my levels where they should be.”

    4. Progesterone – Coil

    As we explained, most hormone replacement therapy combines estrogen and progestogen. While many women take a progesterone pill called utrogestion, Davina doesn’t because she has a coil that provides it. “The progesterone part of my HRT, I get from the Mirena coil,” she shares with her followers.

    About her daily routine, she says: “I know you’d think it’s a fluff, but I feel normal again and dare I sometimes feel better than I have in years and years.” I feel better than him. So to me, Faf is worth it.”

    Considering trying HRT yourself? Aziz Scott recommends you seek medical advice from your GP – ideally one who has expert knowledge in menopause, she shares. “Remember to ask for bodydentical or bioidentical HRT, as we know this is the best option. Vaginal estrogen creams are also very helpful for vaginal health and can be used safely,” she concludes.

    And remember, your recipe will be unique and unique to your individual needs. “They are designed to help the body deal with the changes, ultimately alleviating many of those unpleasant and difficult symptoms,” concludes Kinsella.

  • Marie Claire enjoys the support of its audience. When you make purchases through links on our site, we may earn commissions on certain items you select.

  • As nationwide shortages rocked Britain.

    You have probably seen the news that there is a nationwide shortage of HRT in the UK, which is set to affect one million women. So, do you know what actually happens when you stop taking HRT, for the thousands of women who will have no choice but to stop taking their medication in the coming months?

    Good question – but first a little on why the reduction is happening. Dr. Alona Pulde nutrition app Lifesum It believes that this is a result of the reduction in HRT prescription charges. “Demand is currently outpacing supply,” she explains. “That, along with manufacturing problems and issues like COVID, could contribute to shortages by impacting access to materials.”

    Here, Pulde and D MurrayCEO and Founder Menopause Specialist GroupIn this article, explain what really happens to your body when you go off medication, should you be forced (or choose to). While you’re here, don’t miss our guide to menopause, perimenopause symptoms, and more about menopause and sleep. And remember – you are not alone.

    What happens when you stop taking HRT?

    Some background information for you – the lack of HRT is really pushing women to their limits. “Not only is the current shortage forcing women to ration their supplements, but also getting private prescriptions and getting new supplies from overseas,” explains Pulde.

    According to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice), around one million women in the UK use hormone replacement therapy to treat menopausal symptoms, and deficiency can have potentially devastating effects on their health.

    So what if you have to stop taking your medicine? As Murray points out, women who come off HRT suddenly may start to see symptoms come back much more quickly than if they’ve been taking it for a long time.

    “Reducing your HRT dose gradually is usually recommended, as this is less likely to bring back symptoms in the short term, but there is no reason why you can’t just go cold turkey and see the return of symptoms.” Apart from that,” she says.

    Note here: If you experienced symptoms like hot flushes or sleep disturbances before having HRT, there’s a good chance they’ll return, she explains. “However, the body may have time to adjust, which means they may not be too severe. Everyone is different,” she stresses.

    NHS website Agreed, further adding that gradually reducing your HRT dosage is recommended “as this makes it less likely for your symptoms to return in the short term.”

    If you have symptoms that persist for several months or have questions, contact a GP. After all, they are there to help.

    If You Run Off Medication, 5 Tips for Coping with Coming Off HRT

    After coming off your medication cold turkey and worried about how your body might react? Try the following tips from our experts.

    1. Eat Enough tryptophan And phytoestrogens– rich foods

    That’s right – consuming enough foods that contain Tryptophan – An essential amino acid – important because it helps your body manufacture the neurotransmitter serotonin. “Serotonin plays an important role in mood regulation, which is especially important during menopause,” Pulday explains.

    Elevate your plate with good sources of tryptophan, including:

    • Tofu
    • mad
    • seeds (especially peanuts)
    • Oat
    • Legumes.

    “Fruits are also a good source of tryptophan, especially apples, plums, pineapples, bananas, kiwis and prunes,” shares the doctor.

    Not only that, but some plant-based foods that contain phytoestrogens Can also help ease symptoms and ease anxiety, shares Murray.

    try:

    • chickpeas
    • Sesame seeds
    • mad
    • dark leafy green vegetables

    They are all “excellent”, in the opinion of experts, for maintaining good hormonal health.

    2. Choose Foods High in Fiber

    This will help control your hunger cues, shares Pulde. “Choose foods high in fiber, water and nutrients, and low in fat, sugar, and salt,” doctors advise.

    She recommends:

    • Vegetables (kale, swiss chard, beets, broccoli)
    • Fruits (apples, pears, blueberries)
    • Whole grains and legumes (black-eyed peas, kidney beans)

    Why? “All of the above are rich in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phytochemicals and will not only optimize your health, but will also help control your hunger signals.”

    While you’re here, read our guide to the best smoothie recipes.

    3. Decrease Your Stress Level

    While this is undoubtedly a very stressful time, relying on mindfulness techniques like breathing, mediation, etc. can help with your mental health, if nothing else. “Doing yoga or having cognitive behavioral therapy sessions with a psychotherapist can help reduce high levels of stress, anxiety, and anxiety,” explains Murray.

    While you’re here, read our guides to breathing training, yoga poses, and online therapy.

    4. Identify Problem Foods

    Similarly, using a trial-and-error system—that is, identifying the foods that trigger migraines, hot flushes, anxiety, and heartburn—is another important way to manage symptoms, the expert shares.

    top tip: Keep a food diary and know which foods or drinks are triggers, she advises. “Often it’s simple things, like caffeine, that can be disguised in fizzy drinks or alcohol.”

    5. And remember, you are not alone

    And finally, know that this is a completely unprecedented situation that no one could have imagined. Still don’t understand what happens when you stop taking HRT? Worried about running out of your prescription? Or no longer about getting HRT over the counter?

    Contact your doctor. They are in the best position – and appropriately qualified – to advise the best course of action.

  • Marie Claire enjoys the support of its audience. When you make purchases through links on our site, we may earn commissions on certain items you select.

  • “The thought of using one used to shrink my cervix… but am I glad I tried it? Exactly.”

    You’ve all heard of using a cup for your period—you know, choosing a plastic cup to put in your vagina instead of a tampon or pad, which causes a lot of waste. .

    And if you’ve wondered what it’s really like to use one – insertion and all – then you’re at the right place. We’ve tried and tested a lot of things for you guys in the name of journalism – from Simpove supplements to acupuncture for inflammation.

    next? One MC The author details his experience using a cup for the duration. Scroll through to read how she went ahead and don’t miss our health editor’s guide to how to choose a menstrual cup — plus 14 of her favorites — while you’re here.

    Using a Cup for Periods: “The phrase period cup shrank my cervix, but I was surprised.”

    Okay. Let me give you some background on why I thought of using a cup for my period. I’ve been a vegetarian for 11 years and although I’ve come to know about recycling facts and the general way, after the recent global disasters, something clicked inside me and I’m trying to be more environmentally conscious.

    But, I am also a 28-year-old woman who likes to lead an easy, convenient life.

    And no, the two don’t always go together.

    I try to make changes where I can and it was only a matter of time until I got my menstrual cup. It’s good for the environment, my wallet, it lowers the chances of bacterial infections like thrush because they don’t contain anything that will disrupt your pH level and the convenience is quite strong.

    according to research intimateWomen who use menstrual cups can also have better sex. Apparently 84% of the 1,500 who tested the menstrual cup felt more confident during the phase of their menstrual cycle, while 78% felt more comfortable in their bodies. And thanks to it, 28% reported an improvement in their sex life as dryness in the cup decreased. So, I was sold it on the go.

    When you think a lot of mainstream tampons and pads (read our guide on how to use tampons here) contain bleached rayon that can create the by-product dioxin (which is carcinogenic, no less), then It might be time to think about you. Other options that also include organic cotton and unbleached feminine products.

    However, the term “period cup” has always caused my cervix to shrink. I’m also not a big fan of tampons tbh, so this was going to be a stretch. (Excuse the pun.)

    Choosing the Right Brand of Period Cups

    Even though the period cup was first invented by midwives in 1932, they are having a moment. intimate Has its own line of menstrual cups, as do boots And Superdrug, then you’ve got mooncup – The most famous brands – and for the more organized minded, organic cup,

    i decided to try organic cup, They’re all BPA-free and made from medical-grade silicone, but it was also free of latex, dyes, toxins, or bleach, which, as an organic beauty lover, ticked all my boxes. They are reusable for years and you can wear them for up to twelve hours.

    12 hours means I can put it on in the comfort of my home and take it out from the comfort of my home too. It also means no more one of those awkward office trips to the toilet smuggling sanitary products up my sleeve.

    I found a size A which is recommended for women who haven’t given birth before and can hold 25ml of blood which is the equivalent of three super tampons. (You’re going to be reading more about blood soon, so some of you might want to close this tab for now.)

    To learn how to insert a period cup

    So I decided to give it a try. Was it easy, no? Was it rewarding? In the end, yes. Will I use it every period? Maybe not the beginning…

    I struggled to implement it. In fact, to such an extent, I asked my boss if I could work from home that day because I knew it would be a process.

    I first tried using the ‘C fold’ method, where you essentially fold the cup in half and then put it inside you. Not only did I need to use an organic water-based lubricant to get it going, I could tell the cup wasn’t opening inside me (AKA suctioning) but I didn’t even realize it until I whitened Didn’t wear underwear and noticed leakage.

    Frustrated, I went to take it out and it resulted in a bit of panic as I couldn’t get it out initially. Unlike a tampon, it requires a bit more grip on the stem to get it out and by that time, it was too deep inside me. But, I remembered the instruction that I needed to use to push my abdominal muscles down, so I did.

    Without knowing that I had said muscles, it was an enlightening discovery for me. I then ‘pushed’ it down until I had a good grip on the stem and then pulled it out with a little bit of excitement – and yes, it was like a mini murder scene. Instead of carefully removing it and pouring the contents down the toilet, I took it out like I was pulling out hairs. My enthusiasm over my newly found muscles was a little misplaced and premature, obviously.

    So, I Googled and looked at YouTube videos on the different folds (they often feature these inside a champagne flute, which I thought made the whole experience great) and two ‘punch-down folds’ Or decided to take along ‘Seven-Fold’. ‘ Because these are there to help you open the cup inside more easily.

    Take two out it was great. I pushed a little until the stem came out and then I took it out on the loo and it was too much. However, when I washed it in the sink, I foolishly put my tap directly into the cup so that things got a little messy there—but, progress.

    Now trying to incorporate it in my third attempt. I used a ‘punch-down fold’ and I needed to lift it up a bit more in there to open it, but when I turned it around and once it was in I heard a slight suction noise – it was really pretty Was comfortable because you can’t feel it at all.

    My final thoughts on period cups:

    I’ll definitely need some practice before I can be 100% confident with this method full time, but am I glad I tried it? of course.

    Using a cup for periods: Middle adult women holding a reusable menstrual cup, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    But, don’t take it from me, I spoke to another journalist too, Lisa BowmanOne of these experienced user, which assures me to keep going…

    Lisa tells us, ‘After working at a surf camp in India and being one of the few people who never used it, I’ve been using the Mooncup for a year. ‘I’ve always seen and scoffed at mooncup ads behind service station toilet doors, but suddenly it made so much sense – tampons are really hard to get hold of in countries like India, so instead of bringing a huge supply of tampons, go to your rut In, you just bring a little mooncup. Plus, it holds more blood than a tampon so you can stay in the water for a longer period of time.

    When I looked into it further, I realized how bad tampons are for the environment (they just end up in landfills or the ocean, doubly so if there’s an applicator involved) and how bad they are for your vagina ( They basically suck all the moisture out of you), especially if they’re not organic. Plus, you can get menstrual cups for under £20 and they last a long time, so you save so much money. I got a cup as soon as I got back to the UK – it was a no brainer.

    It took a few cycles to get used to – I was always paranoid that it was leaking (it rarely was) so I use liners or towels until you get used to it, for peace of mind I would advise to do It also took a while to remove it when it was full – at first there was a lot of blood on the bathroom floor, but now I’m a pro. It might be awkward even trying to rinse it off in a public bathroom, but I haven’t needed to change it at work anyway (you can keep it on longer than a tampon). If necessary, just take a bottle of water with you to the cubicle. You’ll have to really lift your fingers to put it in/out, but if you’re used to using non-applicator tampons, you should be fine. And shouldn’t we all be more comfortable with our bodies anyway?’

  • Marie Claire enjoys the support of its audience. When you make purchases through links on our site, we may earn commissions on certain items you select.

  • “The thought of using one used to shrink my cervix… but am I glad I tried it? Exactly.”

    You’ve all heard of using a cup for your period—you know, choosing a plastic cup to put in your vagina instead of a tampon or pad, which causes a lot of waste. .

    And if you’ve wondered what it’s really like to use one – insertion and all – then you’re at the right place. We’ve tried and tested a lot of things for you guys in the name of journalism – from Simpove supplements to acupuncture for inflammation.

    next? One MC The author details his experience using a cup for the duration. Scroll through to read how she went ahead and don’t miss our health editor’s guide to how to choose a menstrual cup — plus 14 of her favorites — while you’re here.

    Using a Cup for Periods: “The phrase period cup shrank my cervix, but I was surprised.”

    Okay. Let me give you some background on why I thought of using a cup for my period. I’ve been a vegetarian for 11 years and although I’ve come to know about recycling facts and the general way, after the recent global disasters, something clicked inside me and I’m trying to be more environmentally conscious.

    But, I am also a 28-year-old woman who likes to lead an easy, convenient life.

    And no, the two don’t always go together.

    I try to make changes where I can and it was only a matter of time until I got my menstrual cup. It’s good for the environment, my wallet, it lowers the chances of bacterial infections like thrush because they don’t contain anything that will disrupt your pH level and the convenience is quite strong.

    according to research intimateWomen who use menstrual cups can also have better sex. Apparently 84% of the 1,500 who tested the menstrual cup felt more confident during the phase of their menstrual cycle, while 78% felt more comfortable in their bodies. And thanks to it, 28% reported an improvement in their sex life as dryness in the cup decreased. So, I was sold it on the go.

    When you think a lot of mainstream tampons and pads (read our guide on how to use tampons here) contain bleached rayon that can create the by-product dioxin (which is carcinogenic, no less), then It might be time to think about you. Other options that also include organic cotton and unbleached feminine products.

    However, the term “period cup” has always caused my cervix to shrink. I’m also not a big fan of tampons tbh, so this was going to be a stretch. (Excuse the pun.)

    Choosing the Right Brand of Period Cups

    Even though the period cup was first invented by midwives in 1932, they are having a moment. intimate Has its own line of menstrual cups, as do boots And Superdrug, then you’ve got mooncup – The most famous brands – and for the more organized minded, organic cup,

    i decided to try organic cup, They’re all BPA-free and made from medical-grade silicone, but it was also free of latex, dyes, toxins, or bleach, which, as an organic beauty lover, ticked all my boxes. They are reusable for years and you can wear them for up to twelve hours.

    12 hours means I can put it on in the comfort of my home and take it out from the comfort of my home too. It also means no more one of those awkward office trips to the toilet smuggling sanitary products up my sleeve.

    I found a size A which is recommended for women who haven’t given birth before and can hold 25ml of blood which is the equivalent of three super tampons. (You’re going to be reading more about blood soon, so some of you might want to close this tab for now.)

    To learn how to insert a period cup

    So I decided to give it a try. Was it easy, no? Was it rewarding? In the end, yes. Will I use it every period? Maybe not the beginning…

    I struggled to implement it. In fact, to such an extent, I asked my boss if I could work from home that day because I knew it would be a process.

    I first tried using the ‘C fold’ method, where you essentially fold the cup in half and then put it inside you. Not only did I need to use an organic water-based lubricant to get it going, I could tell the cup wasn’t opening inside me (AKA suctioning) but I didn’t even realize it until I whitened Didn’t wear underwear and noticed leakage.

    Frustrated, I went to take it out and it resulted in a bit of panic as I couldn’t get it out initially. Unlike a tampon, it requires a bit more grip on the stem to get it out and by that time, it was too deep inside me. But, I remembered the instruction that I needed to use to push my abdominal muscles down, so I did.

    Without knowing that I had said muscles, it was an enlightening discovery for me. I then ‘pushed’ it down until I had a good grip on the stem and then pulled it out with a little bit of excitement – and yes, it was like a mini murder scene. Instead of carefully removing it and pouring the contents down the toilet, I took it out like I was pulling out hairs. My enthusiasm over my newly found muscles was a little misplaced and premature, obviously.

    So, I Googled and looked at YouTube videos on the different folds (they often feature these inside a champagne flute, which I thought made the whole experience great) and two ‘punch-down folds’ Or decided to take along ‘Seven-Fold’. ‘ Because these are there to help you open the cup inside more easily.

    Take two out it was great. I pushed a little until the stem came out and then I took it out on the loo and it was too much. However, when I washed it in the sink, I foolishly put my tap directly into the cup so that things got a little messy there—but, progress.

    Now trying to incorporate it in my third attempt. I used a ‘punch-down fold’ and I needed to lift it up a bit more in there to open it, but when I turned it around and once it was in I heard a slight suction noise – it was really pretty Was comfortable because you can’t feel it at all.

    My final thoughts on period cups:

    I’ll definitely need some practice before I can be 100% confident with this method full time, but am I glad I tried it? of course.

    Using a cup for periods: Middle adult women holding a reusable menstrual cup, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    But, don’t take it from me, I spoke to another journalist too, Lisa BowmanOne experienced user of these, which assures me to keep going…

    Lisa tells us, ‘After working at a surf camp in India and being one of the few people who never used it, I’ve been using the Mooncup for a year. ‘I’ve always seen and scoffed at mooncup ads behind service station toilet doors, but suddenly it made so much sense – tampons are really hard to get hold of in countries like India, so instead of bringing a huge supply of tampons, go to your rut In, you just bring a little mooncup. Plus, it holds more blood than a tampon so you can stay in the water for a longer period of time.

    When I looked into it further, I realized how bad tampons are for the environment (they just end up in landfills or the ocean, doubly so if there’s an applicator involved) and how bad they are for your vagina ( They basically suck all the moisture out of you), especially if they’re not organic. Plus, you can get menstrual cups for under £20 and they last a long time, so you save so much money. I got a cup as soon as I got back to the UK – it was a no brainer.

    It took a few cycles to get used to – I was always paranoid that it was leaking (it rarely was) so I use liners or towels until you get used to it, for peace of mind I would advise to do It also took a while to remove it when it was full – at first there was a lot of blood on the bathroom floor, but now I’m a pro. It might be awkward even trying to rinse it off in a public bathroom, but I haven’t needed to change it at work anyway (you can keep it on longer than a tampon). If necessary, just take a bottle of water with you to the cubicle. You’ll have to really lift your fingers to put it in/out, but if you’re used to using non-applicator tampons, you should be fine. And shouldn’t we all be more comfortable with our bodies anyway?’

  • Marie Claire enjoys the support of its audience. When you make purchases through links on our site, we may earn commissions on certain items you select.

  • “The thought of using one used to shrink my cervix… but am I glad I tried it? Exactly.”

    You’ve all heard of using a cup for your period—you know, choosing a plastic cup to put in your vagina instead of a tampon or pad, which causes a lot of waste. .

    And if you’ve wondered what it’s really like to use one – insertion and all – then you’re at the right place. We’ve tried and tested a lot of things for you guys in the name of journalism – from Simpove supplements to acupuncture for inflammation.

    next? One MC The author details his experience using a cup for the duration. Scroll through to read how she went ahead and don’t miss our health editor’s guide to how to choose a menstrual cup — plus 14 of her favorites — while you’re here.

    Using a Cup for Periods: “The phrase period cup shrank my cervix, but I was surprised.”

    Okay. Let me give you some background on why I thought of using a cup for my period. I’ve been a vegetarian for 11 years and although I’ve come to know about recycling facts and the general way, after the recent global disasters, something clicked inside me and I’m trying to be more environmentally conscious.

    But, I am also a 28-year-old woman who likes to lead an easy, convenient life.

    And no, the two don’t always go together.

    I try to make changes where I can and it was only a matter of time until I got my menstrual cup. It’s good for the environment, my wallet, it lowers the chances of bacterial infections like thrush because they don’t contain anything that will disrupt your pH level and the convenience is quite strong.

    according to research intimateWomen who use menstrual cups can also have better sex. Apparently 84% of the 1,500 who tested the menstrual cup felt more confident during the phase of their menstrual cycle, while 78% felt more comfortable in their bodies. And thanks to it, 28% reported an improvement in their sex life as dryness in the cup decreased. So, I was sold it on the go.

    When you think a lot of mainstream tampons and pads (read our guide on how to use tampons here) contain bleached rayon that can create the by-product dioxin (which is carcinogenic, no less), then It might be time to think about you. Other options that also include organic cotton and unbleached feminine products.

    However, the term “period cup” has always caused my cervix to shrink. I’m also not a big fan of tampons tbh, so this was going to be a stretch. (Excuse the pun.)

    Choosing the Right Brand of Period Cups

    Even though the period cup was first invented by midwives in 1932, they are having a moment. intimate Has its own line of menstrual cups, as do boots And Superdrug, then you’ve got mooncup – The most famous brands – and for the more organized minded, organic cup,

    i decided to try organic cup, They’re all BPA-free and made from medical-grade silicone, but it was also free of latex, dyes, toxins, or bleach, which, as an organic beauty lover, ticked all my boxes. They are reusable for years and you can wear them for up to twelve hours.

    12 hours means I can put it on in the comfort of my home and take it out from the comfort of my home too. It also means no more one of those awkward office trips to the toilet smuggling sanitary products up my sleeve.

    I found a size A which is recommended for women who haven’t given birth before and can hold 25ml of blood which is the equivalent of three super tampons. (You’re going to be reading more about blood soon, so some of you might want to close this tab for now.)

    To learn how to insert a period cup

    So I decided to give it a try. Was it easy, no? Was it rewarding? In the end, yes. Will I use it every period? Maybe not the beginning…

    I struggled to implement it. In fact, to such an extent, I asked my boss if I could work from home that day because I knew it would be a process.

    I first tried using the ‘C fold’ method, where you essentially fold the cup in half and then put it inside you. Not only did I need to use an organic water-based lubricant to get it going, I could tell the cup wasn’t opening inside me (AKA suctioning) but I didn’t even realize it until I whitened Didn’t wear underwear and noticed leakage.

    Frustrated, I went to take it out and it resulted in a bit of panic as I couldn’t get it out initially. Unlike a tampon, it requires a bit more grip on the stem to get it out and by that time, it was too deep inside me. But, I remembered the instruction that I needed to use to push my abdominal muscles down, so I did.

    Without knowing that I had said muscles, it was an enlightening discovery for me. I then ‘pushed’ it down until I had a good grip on the stem and then pulled it out with a little bit of excitement – and yes, it was like a mini murder scene. Instead of carefully removing it and pouring the contents down the toilet, I took it out like I was pulling out hairs. My enthusiasm over my newly found muscles was a little misplaced and premature, obviously.

    So, I Googled and looked at YouTube videos on the different folds (they often feature these inside a champagne flute, which I thought made the whole experience great) and two ‘punch-down folds’ Or decided to take along ‘Seven-Fold’. ‘ Because these are there to help you open the cup inside more easily.

    Take two out it was great. I pushed a little until the stem came out and then I took it out on the loo and it was too much. However, when I washed it in the sink, I foolishly put my tap directly into the cup so that things got a little messy there—but, progress.

    Now trying to incorporate it in my third attempt. I used a ‘punch-down fold’ and I needed to lift it up a bit more in there to open it, but when I turned it around and once it was in I heard a slight suction noise – it was really pretty Was comfortable because you can’t feel it at all.

    My final thoughts on period cups:

    I’ll definitely need some practice before I can be 100% confident with this method full time, but am I glad I tried it? of course.

    Using a cup for periods: Middle adult women holding a reusable menstrual cup, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    But, don’t take it from me, I spoke to another journalist too, Lisa BowmanOne experienced user of these, which assures me to keep going…

    Lisa tells us, ‘After working at a surf camp in India and being one of the few people who never used it, I’ve been using the Mooncup for a year. ‘I’ve always seen and scoffed at mooncup ads behind service station toilet doors, but suddenly it made so much sense – tampons are really hard to get hold of in countries like India, so instead of bringing a huge supply of tampons, go to your rut In, you just bring a little mooncup. Plus, it holds more blood than a tampon so you can stay in the water for a longer period of time.

    When I looked into it further, I realized how bad tampons are for the environment (they just end up in landfills or the ocean, doubly so if there’s an applicator involved) and how bad they are for your vagina ( They basically suck all the moisture out of you), especially if they’re not organic. Plus, you can get menstrual cups for under £20 and they last a long time, so you save so much money. I got a cup as soon as I got back to the UK – it was a no brainer.

    It took a few cycles to get used to – I was always paranoid that it was leaking (it rarely was) so I use liners or towels until you get used to it, for peace of mind I would advise to do It also took a while to remove it when it was full – at first there was a lot of blood on the bathroom floor, but now I’m a pro. It might be awkward even trying to rinse it off in a public bathroom, but I haven’t needed to change it at work anyway (you can keep it on longer than a tampon). If necessary, just take a bottle of water with you to the cubicle. You’ll have to really lift your fingers to put it in/out, but if you’re used to using non-applicator tampons, you should be fine. And shouldn’t we all be more comfortable with our bodies anyway?’

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  • 1 in 5 new mothers are affected by some kind of mental health disorder.

    did you know? Each year 800,000 new mothers are affected by a maternal mental health disorder in the US. Although one in five new mothers will be affected, only 25 per cent get treatment, of which 75 per cent go away without professional evaluation.

    According to the World Health Organization, worldwide, 10 to 20% of women who have just given birth will experience a mental health condition. According to the CDC, in the US, while one in eight women report symptoms of depression after giving birth, more than 50% of pregnant women with depression are not treated.

    “While mental health in general is becoming more widely discussed and accepted in popular culture – look at the reaction of brave athletes like Naomi Osaka and Simone Biles, who spoke out about their mental health – there is still a stigma. Which can prevent many people from getting treatment and support when they are struggling,” explains the maternal mental health specialist and chief medical officer. Lifestance Health doctor Anisha Patel-Dunni,

    “For new moms, the chaos, stress, and expectations associated with the early months of motherhood can often trigger mental health concerns that feel wrong during an exciting and joyous time,” she adds.

    Add the year of lockdown to the mix and – yes, you guessed it – it’s no surprise that many mental health practitioners are currently seeing an increase in both the severity and frequency of cases. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused social isolation for many – but Specially For new moms who had to give birth in a hospital bed alone.

    That’s why we spoke to Patel-Dunn. Here, she shares her wisdom, explains why maternal mental health issues need to be addressed more, plus her five top tips for the new mom or mum to keep her mental health in check during such a change. eager to protect.

    remember: You’re not alone.

    Maternal mental health: how to protect your well-being as a new mother

    Also known as maternal mental health, this phrase is primarily used to describe a woman’s mental state during pregnancy and the first year after birth, shares Patel-Dunn.

    “All women can experience mental health conditions during this time, and it is important to remember that maternal mental health has no face,” she adds. “One’s internal experience may be different from what they are externally presented, and each person’s individual experience will be very unique.”

    Symptoms of a maternal mental health problem

    Aka, if you’re struggling with your mental health as a new mother, what are the main symptoms you might be experiencing? There is a whole range of mental health disorders that you can face, from depression to anxiety, from PTSD to trauma.

    As a new mother, it is very common to experience a range of emotions after your baby is born, shares Patel-Dunn. This includes:

    • the sadness
    • Loneliness
    • Worry

    “You may have heard these feelings sometimes referred to as the baby blues,” Patel-Dunn continues.

    If you’re having trouble taking care of yourself or your baby or getting through the day, you may be experiencing a more serious condition called postpartum depression. Symptoms of postpartum depression may include:

    • feeling hopeless
    • feeling helpless
    • questioning your ability to care for your newborn
    • low sense of self
    • low self-esteem
    • inability to sleep
    • difficulty concentrating.

    Again, Patel-Dunn emphasizes here that everyone’s mental health experiences will be different. “Whether you’re experiencing mild or severe symptoms, reaching out for help and support is extremely important,” she stresses.

    Perinatal mental health: happy baby-bearing mom

    maternal mental health resources

    Know this – Patel-Dunn wants all new moms to feel encouraged enough to ask for help when they need it.

    “There are all kinds of resources—both virtual and in-person—that can help, no matter what you’re going through,” she explains.

    1. Don’t be afraid

    Patel-Dunn’s first suggestion: Don’t be afraid to ask for help.

    “It could be a loved one, a friend, or a family member,” she explains. “Just remember, if you need help making an appointment with a mental health provider they won’t mind providing support.”

    found it? You are not a burden, so don’t talk yourself into thinking you are the one.

    2. Use Local Support Groups

    Once you’re open about what you’re going through, Patel-Dunn says that finding a supportive community for those recovering from a maternal mental health condition can be very beneficial.

    “A great place to start is looking for local online support groups or help hotlines in your area,” she shares.

    Not sure where to start? For helpful resources and generally more information, try the following:

    3. Talk to a Qualified Professional

    OK, so you talked to your partner/friend/family member, and then read about the thousands of other women around the world who are happening to you.

    Next up: It’s time to check in with a professional so they can help you decide on the best course of action. “A licensed therapist can help you understand and overcome mental health conditions,” explains Patel-Dunn.

    Our guide to online therapy and the best mental health apps currently available can help.

    4. Try Medication

    Medication won’t be for everyone, and you should only opt for meds if your doctor has prescribed them, but often, they can also help with sleep problems, anxiety issues, and symptoms of depression, explains health professionals. Huh.

    5. Prioritize Self-Care

    Patel-Dunn explains that it can be difficult for new moms and future moms to find time to prioritize self-care.

    However, it is a very important step in supporting your overall mental health, she stresses. Why? Well, because ‘by taking care of your mental health, you’ll be able to better manage stress when it does arise,’ she explains. Plus, ‘you’ll have an overall better quality of life.’

    Read our guide to the best self-care ideas—that are completely free! Now if you need a little inspiration on that front.

    And before you go, know this: Just as postpartum physical recovery is different for every mother, mental health can look different too, experts say. They conclude, “The best way to end the stigma around mental health conditions affecting new mothers is to encourage frank conversation about what mental health looks like and bring awareness to the diversity of experiences.”

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  • “I think it’s the most important thing I’ll ever do.”

    It’s no news that HRT shortages are rocking the UK, and in news today, Davina McCall has vowed to fight “as long as she can” to get women the right care during the crisis.

    The presenter has long spoken openly about her own hormone replacement therapy and treatment, broadcast Sex, Myths and Menopause Last year that detailed her menopause journey.

    So now, with women across the country struggling to get their usual HRT prescriptions due to shortages, she is taking a stand and advocating for the right care for millions of affected women. (Read what happens if you suddenly stop taking HRT, here).

    Sharing that using your platform to drive change is “the most important thing” [she’ll] ever do,” she said: “I think it will be the work of my life now. It’s disappointing, but it looks like we’ve come a long way in the past year in terms of public knowledge and willingness to do something about it.

    “I’ll keep doing it as long as it takes time: I think it’s really important.”

    It has been reported that some women are turning to desperate measures to make sure they get their medicine, such as buying them on the black market.

    In short, HRT works by turning hormones into lower levels during perimenopause, according to the NHS website. A misinterpreted 2002 study found that it could potentially increase your risk of breast cancer—despite a taboo surrounding treatment.

    GPs may also be asked by the Department of Health to limit prescription cycles with the aim of easing current supply issues as much as possible.

    Davina isn’t the only celebrity to speak about her menopause journey — Penny Lancaster did, too, and the two took part in a Menopause Revolution protest outside Downing Street last October.

    a follow-up documentary Sex, Myths and Menopause – called apt Sex, the mind and menopause – To be released at the end of this year.

    The documentary will discuss the HRT taboo, common menopause myths, and how often women are dismissed or unfairly dismissed by showing menopausal symptoms at work.

    Davina has previously said that menopause made her feel “invisible” and “terrified” before taking HRT medication.

    For her, taking hormones was like “rebirth,” and she’s passionate about breaking the taboos surrounding it.

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  • With Wim Hoff as Freeze the Fear hits screens.

    By now, you may have read about Wim Hof ​​and the many benefits of cold water treatments. In case you haven’t, he’s an ice-hugging athlete, also known as The Iceman, who has climbed Kilimanjaro in shorts, ran a half marathon barefoot over the Arctic Circle, and, that is, Likes very cold baths.

    but, QuestionHave you ever taken an ice bath yourself?

    No Cold Shower, Baltic Sea Dip, or Winter Lake Swim – Real ice bath. Vim touted freezing for both mental and physical benefits, with cold can do everything from improving your clarity to promoting muscle growth and repair.

    with bbc Freeze Fear With Wim Hof Now airing, what better time to discuss ice baths and what they can really do for your health?

    Keep reading as Christian Allen, a Product Instructor runners needed Studying sports and exercise science at St. Mary’s University, Twickenham, shares what you need to know. While you’re here, don’t miss our guide to delaying muscle soreness, workout recovery, and preventing injury.

    Ice Baths: Your 6 Most Common Questions, Answers

    What is an ice bath?

    The clue is in the name, really – ice baths are baths filled with ice cubes.

    “An ice bath — also known as cryotherapy or cold water immersion — is where you immerse yourself in a bath, or a similarly sized container filled with water and ice,” explains Allen.

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    How long should I take an ice bath?

    Good question, and it will vary from person to person. according to Journal of Science and Medicine in SportImmersing yourself for 15 minutes is the ideal time for an icy dip, although you may not be able to do this on the first try and should gradually build up your endurance over time.

    Use this: Fill the bath with cold water and a few trays of ice and see how you go. Start with a small goal like two minutes and work your way up from there.

    Note here: If you have any underlying conditions or have any concerns about trying an ice bath, consult a medical professional before trying it.

    What are the benefits of ice bath?

    Athletes have long used them to promote muscle recovery and many well-known trainers, including the likes of Joe Wicks, have ice baths in their gardens. (Read our go-to Joe Wicks workouts here).

    so how they Actually Boost your health? According to the expert, ice baths have been found to:

    • reduce muscle pain
    • aid muscle repair
    • stop muscle soreness
    • improve overall performance
    • soothing swelling and inflammation
    • enhances mental health
    • improves sleep quality
    • Minimizes the risk of injury.

    If you’ve been scratching your head about how an ice cold immersion can boost your mental health, a little background for you: Hoff first turned to cold water therapy in 1995 to overcome the death of his wife. Turned. they shared with daily Mail: “My heart was broken. It’s as much a physical thing as a mental thing. The only thing that gave me peace was the cold.”

    “The cold, harsh nature is the cure, I am convinced. It allows us to live and handle our sorrows.”

    So, of course, you have to work on your breathing training — the exercises are meant to get you out of your comfort zone, literally — but with the discipline and clarity it can encourage, Vim is still about it. One of the main reasons to be concerned. Today so much Academic research indicates that ice baths may help with mental health – this includes 2008 study published in the journal medical hypothesis – but also share that more research is needed.

    How does an ice bath help with muscle pain?

    If you’ve ever experienced DOMs after a hardcore high-intensity interval training session, you’ll want to know the answer.

    “During long or intense workouts, your muscles contract and stretch repeatedly to support your body,” shares Allen. “This makes your muscles a little quicker, which eventually leads to new muscle growth, but can also cause fatigue and muscle soreness,” he adds.

    So, where do ice baths come in and how do they work? Well, the blood that enters these rips has tiny by-products that affect how sore you feel after a run, and an ice bath helps to relieve this feeling by encouraging rapid blood flow, Supporters share.

    “Once you’re out of the ice bath—ideally aiming for ten to 15 minutes—your blood flow will increase to accommodate a new need for heat,” he explains. “As blood flows through you, it flushes away by-products that cause pain.”

    How does an ice bath help repair muscles?

    Another good question. did you know? When you run, your body releases lactic acid—the main reason for the burning sensation you can sometimes feel in your legs when you’re mid-run.

    “Lactic acid is essential during aerobic exercise, which serves as a source of energy,” explains Allen. “That said, once you have finished running, the lactic acid that has built up in the body needs to be recycled – where ice baths can be beneficial.

    how so? Just as they can help remove by-products caused by muscle tearing, ice baths also remove lactic acid from the body, flushing it out with increased blood flow, experts say. shares. “As the blood begins to clear away excess lactic acid and any other unwanted by-products, it has the added bonus of soothing inflammation and swelling.”

    ice bath: woman taking a bath

    How does an ice bath improve your overall health?

    You want to boost your workout recovery largely by taking care of your body, but also to make sure that when you lace up again, your muscles fully recover so that any The workout can be hit — whether it’s one of your favorite barre classes, reformer Pilates, or weight training — over the head.

    “Any expert will tell you that rest and health benefits are just as important as physical activity when exercising,” shares Allen. “Days where you’re not exercising allow your body to repair itself—ice baths help with this recovery, and as a result, your body is better prepared for your next session.”

    So – what do you believe? Are you going to take an icy dip anytime soon?

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  • tried and tested.

    Looking for the best hiking shoes but don’t want to spend a lot of ££ on a pair that will rub, get your feet wet, or have you slipping all over?

    Lucky for you, I’m a health editor who fits sweat test kits for a living and this month, I’m working my way through hiking boots. Why? Because summer is just around the corner and like the rest of you (Thank youlockdown), I spent the last two years walking the shores of Devon and Cornwall for my summer vacation.

    Spoiler alert: While I thought I’d accept the lack of sunshine and frozen cocktails, the opposite happened, and as my guide to the benefits of the UK’s best hikes and walking shows, I fell in love with the great outdoors. For our first week following the Southwest Coastal Path in 2020, it rained all week, yet thanks to my kit, I stayed warm and dry (I’ve never been more grateful for a waterproof rain coat, moisture-wicking gym am) leggings, and sturdy hiking boots).

    So, without further ado, scroll through my roundup of the best hiking shoes. The shoes that support me while traveling are included in this roundup and you’ll be surprised to hear that they cost just under £20. Yes.

    What did I see while testing?

    Good grip, ample ankle support, 100% waterproof material and design, and comfort too – I have fairly sensitive feet so I haven’t included shoes that cause blisters or tingling in the ankle or ball of the foot. the person who walks more? Instead, read our Fashion Aid’s guide to the best walking boots.

    The 5 Best Hiking Boots to Buy Now, According to Fitness Editors

    1. FP Movement x Danner Edrica in Perfect Navy – £153.14 danner

    first things first – just see On the design of these shoes. When I saw the limited-edition collaboration between Free People — a sister company of Urban Outfitters and one of the oldest (and coolest) athleticwear brands — and Danner — The best hiking boot brand, I couldn’t wait to try.

    Taking these shoes out of the box, I immediately noticed how gorgeous both the color and the design are. They are soft to the touch, attractive, and the quality feels better. While the color combination makes me think of sunset hiking and long weekend breaks when taking them for a walk around a muddy wooded park, I found these shoes to be really functional too. They didn’t rub or cause blisters, the grip kept me from applying any mud, and they remained waterproof despite the rain.

    top tip: Go half a size up, because they run short, and be prepared to break them over shorter distances if you’re aching on the balls of your feet like me. Hurry, though – they’re limited edition. – Associate Chief, Health Editor, @allyyhead

    FP Movement Edrica in Perfect Navy – £153.14 | danner

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    2. Timberloop Trekker Hiking Boots for Women – £160 | timberland

    You may have all heard of Timberland shoes, but they were an iconic 90s fashion statement, above all, right? Wrong – as these hiking boots proved.

    More a city boot than a hardcore hiking option (I wouldn’t recommend them for Kilimanjaro training, but would recommend them to your local parks or for weekend loops of dog walks), I found the soles to be padded and comfortable—they didn’t rub and they were breathable. Felt it too. They also have very impressive stability credentials – just launched and specially designed for roundness, they have a “unique sole construction” which means all elements of the shoe can be easily detached and can be put into the relevant recycling streams. clean.

    Cons: They don’t offer ankle support, stopping less than other options in this roundup, and they get dirty very quickly (best not for jumping through muddy puddles). That said, I was surprised at how easily the mud comes off once it’s cleaned. I’d also recommend treating with a pre-using balm, which I didn’t. – Associate Chief, Health Editor, @allyyhead

    Women’s Timberloop Trekker Hiking Boot – £160 | timberland

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    3. Sweaty Betty x Merrell Moab Speed ​​Gore-Tex® – £125 | Merrell

    OK, okay, so technically not a hiking boot, but I really rated these Sweaty Betty x Merrell hiking shoes. They had the best grip, waterproof material, and breathability of all the designs I tested, plus I found them seriously comfortable.

    I was also pleasantly surprised by how lightweight they are, while still offering good arch support in-shoe. If you are someone who seriously does not like chunky or heavy shoes or prefers to travel lightly, I would go for these. Likewise, if you’re prone to injury, they’re a win-win, because they’re lightweight—so don’t cause you to overpronate or overcompensate, while offering advanced support and functionality.

    I wore them for a hike around Epping Forest and really rated them. – Associate Chief, Health Editor, @allyyhead

    Women’s Moab Speed ​​GORE-TEX® – £125.00 | Sweaty Betty x Merrell

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    4. Women’s running shoes – £19.99 | decathlon

    Spoiler alert: These are the walking boots I mentioned above that have helped me hike and walk the South West Coastal Path even in torrential downpours in both the Three Peaks, Lake, and Peak Districts.

    While their support isn’t as good as, say, the SB x Merrell shoes above, I’ve had them for years and I’ve never had any complaints. I’m sure they’ll fall apart soon, but so far, they’ve been a good investment that has supported me over 100+ miles.

    Key Pros: They’re affordable for all price points, and I found them to be comfortable on my heels, soft, and support my arch. I also thought they were particularly easy to do and impressively waterproof – I’ve never experienced any leaks.

    That said, at only £20, they are not the highest price point or quality and certainly do start to get a bit smelly over time. However, they have seen me during many holidays and I will buy again. – Associate Chief, Health Editor, @allyyhead

    Women’s running shoes – £19.99 | decathlon

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    5. Women’s Trailstorm™ Mid Waterproof Walking Shoe – £100.00, Colombia

    When it comes to hiking I’m a very beginner and probably only use running shoes once every few years. So when I was invited on a walking vacation to the Isle of Skye this year, my main priority was to choose a hiking shoe that didn’t take away from a trainer or shoe I’d usually wear for a long time. There was no need to break till – in time.

    I opted for the Columbia Trailstorm Mid Women Walking Boot and they did not disappoint. I found them to be breathable, lightweight and with a stable high collar fit, easy to wear and extremely comfortable, not to mention featuring zero break-in periods (which was really the biggest selling point for me).

    As someone who suffers from rheumatoid nodules on my ankles, it was really important to find a boot that had a lightweight and flexible sole and good ankle support so as not to pound it. Spoiler alert: I came back from Skye with zero pain, so for me, the Columbia Trailstorm Boot was a success.

    They held up well to many of the terrain we faced – rocks, hills, seawalls, and so on, and I can personally testify to them being impervious (I accidentally lost my entire foot during our climb) put in a swamp and it dried, so you get the picture).

    Only drawbacks? I noted a lack of grip on slippery surfaces, minimal arch support, and a very narrow fit. NB: Definitely choose a size with these hiking boots. I went for my size and found the fit a little more comfortable.

    I would definitely recommend these hiking boots – if not only for the comfortable ankle support and the luxury of breaking them in. —Jenny Proudfoot, Features Editor, @jenny_proudfoot

    Women’s Trailstorm™ Mid Waterproof Walking Shoe – £100.00 | Colombia

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    Happy hiking.

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  • This is the new weight loss buzzword, but does it really work for healthy, lasting fat loss?

    It’s that time of year again, when weight loss plans seem to be spamming you on social media with more than targeted ads and buzzy celebrity workouts. With an enormous amount of noise about Kim K’s Met Gala weight loss, ‘what do I eat in a day’ reel and questionable (often unqualified) nutritional posts, everyone is talking about the 4:3 diet. .

    On a fasting weight loss plan, you are advised to eat as normal for four days, and 500 calories for the remaining three days of the week. 500 calories a day very cum – the NHS Women are recommended to eat 2,000 calories a day—so we’ve talked to two qualified nutritionists to get an idea of ​​their intake.

    First things first before we get into the specifics of the diet: You don’t need to lose weight before summer. you don’t need To lose weight, and never feel pressured to try diet fads or weight loss plans. Most upside anyway – if you put your body into starvation mode, it will just cling to any fat you have for dear life.

    However, if you’re willing to lose a little weight for your own health or personal reasons, that’s perfectly fine too. For each. Never feel pressured to lose weight, but if you want to lose weight with positive headspace and a healthy, sustainable angle, it’s entirely up to you. just know you never need To. You are enough just as you are.

    Keep reading for qualified picks from both nutritionists Jenna Hope and nutritionist The Nutri Center, Katy Mason,

    What is 4:3 Diet?

    The 4:3 diet is a form of intermittent fasting where you reduce your calories to 500 calories per day, three days a week, explains Hope.

    “These days should be alternate days, as per the plan. On “off” days, you are encouraged to eat normally,” she shares.

    How does the 4:3 diet work?

    It’s kind of similar to the 5:2 diet, where you fast for two consecutive days a week – that is, 500 calories and 600 calories for men. Then, you eat as you normally would for another five days.

    The 4:3 plan takes it a step further, suggesting that you eat what you want for four days and fast for three days (consuming only 500 calories).

    necessarily, It is just a type of intermittent fasting. Fasting has been around since at least the 5th century BCE, yet the nutrition world is divided about its pros and cons. while many Research This indicates that while fasting is good for weight loss and lowering high blood pressure, it can also be incredibly difficult to trigger antisocial, and disordered eating behavior if you have a history of eating disorders.

    Other Research It has also been found that fasting is no more effective than other diets, such as the Sirtfood diet, the Dukan diet and the Cambridge diet, for example. Many argue that if you can still lose weight more sustainably, then limiting your calories to a quarter of what the NHS recommends you eat is simply not healthy or sensible.

    pay attention, studies has found that intermittent fasting can be helpful for people with diabetes.

    What do you eat on the 4:3 diet?

    Hope explains that individuals on the 4:3 diet are limited to consuming 500 calories per day during their fasting days. “As a result, What you can eat is very restricted, Many people consume liquids that have no calories, black coffee, tea and low-calorie foods,” she shares.

    In his book, every other day dietKrista Vardy and Bill Gottlieb give some guidance on how to fast – but note, this is an extremely low calorie count for anyone, and neither nutritionist would recommend it.

    4:3 Diet: A woman tracks her calories on an app on her phone

    During your fasting days, it is suggested that you:

    1. Eat a 400-calorie meal or two 200-calorie meals, plus a 100-calorie snack
    2. drink a lot of water
    3. drink tea and coffee
    4. If you are too busy to cook then have pre-packaged meals with extra vegetables.

    On your normal days, it is suggested that you:

    1. Eat as much as you want – nothing is off limits
    2. Don’t feel deprived.

    They recommend you eat high-protein foods, high-fat foods and, where possible, limit your sweetener intake. Not sure how to increase your protein? Our guides to the best protein powders and vegetarian protein sources can help.

    So… should I try the 4:3 diet?

    There are many problems with this diet.as expected.

    Why? Well, as if restricting your calories so much on your fasting days means you’re not consuming enough calories—at all. “Low caloric intake means there is an increased real risk of nutrient deficiencies,” shares Hope.

    Plus, eating 500 calories a day is too little, and can be dangerous for some. You may feel faint or have difficulty concentrating.

    It’s possible to lose weight while still enjoying your favorite foods, so why cut out all of them and risk a disordered relationship with food, nutritionists ask? ,Fasting days promote significant restriction, which is a high risk factor for poor association with food.“Speaks hope.

    Would a nutritionist recommend you try the 4:3 diet?

    In short, no. “I certainly wouldn’t recommend the 4:3 diet as a healthy weight loss tool,” shares Hope. ,It is restrictive, reductionist and ignores the importance of consuming a variety of foods rich in micronutrients and supporting essential macronutrient demands for optimal functioning,” she explains.

    Plus, she explains, if you restrict that much to three days a week, you’re even more likely to overeat on the other four days. Don’t do it yourself – there are healthy, sensible, safe ways you can lose weight, as Hope outlines below.

    3 Tips To Lose Weight-Healthily And Permanently

    1. Focus on Attainable Calorie Deficits

    Weight loss, ultimately, is about burning more calories than you are eating. Your daily calorie burn is made up of two things — the calories you just burn (called your non-exercise activity thermogenesis, or NEAT) and the calories you burn with exercise. How much do you burn your favorite free home workout or joe. vicks youtube workout

    If you can meet your daily burn—there are plenty of useful apps out there to help you do so—you can easily lose weight by eating about 1400 to 1,500 calories a day, which also ensures Enough that you do not lack anything. major mineral or nutrient.

    Pay attention to what you can include in your diet, adding more beans, pulses, fruits and vegetables will naturally displace some high-sugar, high-fat foods which in turn can help with weight loss. can. Tips for how to eat the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables in a day, here.

    2. Try Indulging in Your Snacking

    Often, if you eat snacks throughout the day, you won’t realize how many calories you’re consuming, share both nutritionists.

    “If possible, also try and limit your snacking after dinner,” Hope advises. “People who snack later in the evening are more likely to opt for high-sugar, high-calorie foods.

    top tip: Make sure your dinner is satiating. This will help reduce evening snacking and in turn prevent overeating,” she explains. Our healthy breakfast ideas can come in handy too.

    3. Move More

    Simple, but important. If you want to lose weight, how many calories will you burn in a day by walking more daily? Everything matters – from running to skipping, to Zumba. the world is your oyster.

    Remember, everyone’s weight loss is different. What works for you may not work for others – and that’s okay.